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How We’ll Get Power in the Future : Germany could be the model

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Our world is increasing and it needs more power day by day. Surely we need some very good source of power in the upcoming future. What is Germany doing now could be model to the whole world.

Also See : WORLD’S FIRST GRID-CONNECTED WAVE POWER STATION SWITCHED ON IN AUSTRALIA

HAMBURG KNEW THE BOMBS WERE COMING and so the prisoners of war and forced laborers had just half a year to build the giant flak bunker. By July 1943 it was finished. A windowless cube of reinforced concrete, with seven-foot-thick walls and an even thicker roof, it towered like a medieval castle above a park near the Elbe River. The guns protruding from its four turrets would sweep Allied bombers from the sky, the Nazis promised, while tens of thousands of citizens sheltered safely behind its impenetrable walls.

Coming in at night from the North Sea just weeks after the bunker was finished, British bombers steered for the spire of St. Nikolai in the center of the city. They dropped clouds of metallic foil strips to throw off German radar and flak gunners. Targeting crowded residential neighborhoods, the bombers ignited an unquenchable firestorm that destroyed half of Hamburg and killed more than 34,000 people. Towering walls of fire created winds so strong that people were blown into the flames. Church bells clanged furiously.

Also See: PANASONIC HAS MADE THE WORLD’S MOST EFFICIENT ROOFTOP SOLAR PANEL

Germany is pioneering an epochal transformation it calls the energiewende—an energy revolution that scientists say all nations must one day complete if a climate disaster is to be averted. Among large industrial nations, Germany is a leader. Last year about 27 percent of its electricity came from renewable sources such as wind and solar power, three times what it got a decade ago and more than twice what the United States gets today. The change accelerated after the 2011 meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant, which led Chancellor Angela Merkel to declare that Germany would shut all 17 of its own reactors by 2022. Nine have been switched off so far, and renewables have more than picked up the slack.

Decline in Emissions

Germany’s renewable-energy surge has contributed to a 27 percent reduction in its greenhouse gas emissions.
Total emissions (CO2 equivalent), 1990-2012
*Latest available data
JASON TREAT, NG STAFF; EVAN APPLEGATE
SOURCES: FRAUNHOFER IWES, KASSEL; U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION; GERMAN FEDERAL MINISTRY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT; EUROSTAT

If you ask why antinuclear sentiment has been so much more consequential in Germany than, say, across the Rhine in France, which still gets 75 percent of its electricity from nukes, you end up back at the war. It left Germany a divided country, the front along which two nuclear superpowers faced off. Demonstrators in the 1970s and ’80s were protesting not just nuclear reactors but plans to deploy American nuclear missiles in West Germany. The two didn’t seem separable. When the German Green Party was founded in 1980, pacifism and opposition to nuclear power were both central tenets.

See how German citizens are preparing for more renewable energy industries.

Picture of German offshore wind turbines

A sea of photovoltaic panels surrounds the runway at the Eberswalde-Finow Airport, 30 miles north of Berlin. Germany is at the same latitude as Labrador, Canada, but has installed more solar capacity than any other country. Most panels are on rooftops.

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